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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
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What sort of accommodation can I expect ?
Teahouses are generally locally built of timber and are very comfortable. They usually provide single and double rooms as well as the occasional dormitory. The dining room is downstairs around a fire. All food will be cooked to order in the little kitchen. You should not enter the kitchen unless asked to do so. The toilet facilities will be outside. Most lodges provide a mattress, and a quilt or blanket. It’s a good idea to always have a sleeping bag, sleeping mat and perhaps an inflatable pillow. Most places will provide you with a lock for your room, but you may prefer to use one of your own. Theft is almost unheard of from the lodgeowners; security is more of a risk around other Westerners.
Along the way there are a few ‘upmarket’ places to stay, or even just relax for lunch: Everest View Hotel (Syangboche), Gokyo Resort (Gokyo), 8000 Inn (Lobuche) and Jomsom Mountain Resort (Jomsom). For an extra charge we can arrange a night’s stay at any of these before you leave Kathmandu, or you may just like to wait till the urge overtakes you on the trail - don’t forget those US dollars!
If you choose a camping trek, a tent will be provided if you do not have your own. We provide a kitchen tent, dining tent and toilet tents for all camping treks. You should bring your own sleeping bags, mats and whatever other home comforts you need. We usually camp in or near a village, which allows you to buy luxury items such as chocolate, beer or soft drinks, which we do not carry with us. We also provide a limited amount of toilet paper and facilities for hand and face washing before meals. You will also get a bowl of hot water each morning in your tent for a quick scrub up.

What sort of food can I expect?
Most teahouses cook a delicious range of mostly vegetarian fare. Pasta, tuna bakes, noodles, potatoes, eggs, dhal bhat, bread, soups, fresh vegetables (variety depends on the season) and even some desserts like apple pies, pancakes, and some interesting attempts at custard. You will find a lot of garlic on the menu because it assists with acclimatization – eat some every day. In many larger villages you may find some meat on the menu. You can always get hot chocolate, tea, and hot lemon drinks, as well as soft drinks, and treats like chocolate and crisps.
If you are on a camping trek the cook can prepare specially requested food if you advise before leaving Kathmandu. In any case, you will have similar fare to teahouses, except that along the way we may buy some fresh local produce such as fish, chicken or cheese to supplement the supplies. And the cost of all the food we prepare is included in the price of the camping treks – you can eat as much as you like.
Whichever option you choose, you can be assured that the food is fresh, nutritious and tasty.
If you have any special dietary requirements please advise us in advance so that we can make the necessary arrangements.

What happens if I get sick?
The most important thing is DON’T PANIC. You should ALWAYS ensure that you have a well-stocked and appropriate medical kit as well as sufficient insurance in case you should have to be evacuated. A slight case of diarrhoea is to be expected, as well as sprains and muscle aches – all a part of walking in the hills. Altitude sickness is extremely dangerous but mostly avoidable if you follow a few simple rules: trek high and sleep low, drink at least 2 litres of water per day (not including beer or soft drinks!), and BE SENSIBLE. If you feel shortness of breath, a slight headache or dizziness, tell your porter/guide and rest immediately. Lie down, drink water. If you are still feeling unwell you may consider going down a few hundred metres. Do not pretend you are okay, and do not go down alone. A descent of a few hundred metres overnight may be enough to make you fully able to start trekking again tomorrow. For more information, please go to: www.high-altitude-medicine.com This excellent site will tell you all you need to know, and also includes a phonetic Nepali questionnaire for your porter. Porters are just as prone to altitude sickness as everyone else is.


How can I look after my porter?
Always make sure that your porter has enough warm and waterproof clothes – if he does not ask us to provide some. Keep an eye on your porter (just as he will keep an eye on you) when on the trail. The porter is working for you and his welfare is your responsibility – if he is unwell give him the day off and watch him. If he shows signs of altitude sickness you must be firm and take him down to a safer altitude. Never leave him to wander alone down the mountain. Make sure that he has sufficient food and drink.
Your porter can also be your friend – talk to him about his family. Most porters are students trying to earn extra cash, or married with very young families. These guys can be away from home for months on end carrying packs up and down hills. It’s a hard life and small gestures of appreciation, like buying them a cup of tea, never go astray. Mountain Club is a member of IPPG (International Porter Protection Group) – go to their website at www.ippg.net for more information.

What’s the weather going to be like?
Weather in the mountains is notoriously difficult to predict. Of course, at night it is generally cold, and in winter the days can be quite beautiful if the sun is out. There can be snow or rain storms any time of the year. Trekking in spring (March – April) is particularly lovely as the rhododendrons are in full bloom, and the mountains still have plenty of high snow to enhance your photos. You need to be aware that it can get pretty hot and sunstroke can be a risk. Good polarising sunglasses or glacier glasses (not trendy fashion ones) for high altitudes/winter treks, and a large brimmed hat are a necessity. It is also important to make sure that you can stay warm and dry in just about any conditions. Expect the unexpected!
If unsure about the weather conditions on the trail ask your guide.

What if I take more or less time on my trek than I had planned and paid for?
A trekking holiday should never be about making it to the final point quickly. In fact, most of the time it isn’t even about the end point. Walking in the mountains is about enjoying the beauty of the people and places. You pay the porter/guide per day, and any differences can be made up on your return. Remember, it’s your holiday and so long as you enjoy your trip the time taken is mostly irrelevant. You may find that weather or illness means you have to turn back, sit it out or take another route. No problem!

What if the guide/porter leaves me alone the trail?
Sometimes the porter/guide may go on ahead if you are walking slowly on an easy trail, usually to find a good place to eat or stay the night. However, this doesn’t mean that you have been abandoned. Mountain Club porters or guides will NEVER leave you for long periods and will never steal your bag or belongings. Guaranteed.

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